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AAC&U 2020 Annual Meeting: Four Faculty-Focused Tracks Through the Agenda

group convened for panel presentationCOACHE research on the professoriate is shaping the future of higher education leadership, so we are eager to attend next week’s annual meeting of the Association of American Colleges & Universities, “Shaping the Future of Higher Education: An Invitation to Lead.” While the program is characteristically overflowing with opportunities to learn and to network, we have identified four tracks through the January 22-25 schedule where we expect to find most of our partners:... Read more about AAC&U 2020 Annual Meeting: Four Faculty-Focused Tracks Through the Agenda

A Changing Faculty Requires Change Leadership: Implications of The Gig Academy for Provosts and Deans

by Adrianna Kezar, PhD. Dean's Professor of Leadership, University of Southern California; Co-director, Pullias Center; Director, Delphi Project

A classroom chalkboard and stack of booksFor this guest blog post, we asked Prof. Adrianna Kezar to apply her research and experience to cite, critique and extend two recent Change Magazine articles on cultivating faculty leadership and indicators of institutional resilience. Kezar considers implications of her latest work, The Gig Academy, and the new edition of How Colleges Change, for leadership of and by the faculty.... Read more about A Changing Faculty Requires Change Leadership: Implications of The Gig Academy for Provosts and Deans

Where the Faculty Affairs Things Are (Now): Conferences and Convenings Updated

by Kiernan Mathews

 

People listening to a conference presentationSeveral years ago, I observed here that the assistant, associate, and vice provosts and deans with institution-wide responsibility for faculty success (I call them “chief faculty affairs officers” or CFAOs) often find themselves alone on their campuses. Without a community of practice in academic personnel and faculty development, people in these roles “set sail to distant places” to find the professional advice and emotional support that fundraisers, admissions officers, and student affairs administrators (for example) find closer to home. At the time, there was no magnetic pole for faculty affairs professionals, so I offered links to several conferences and associations where they could piece together a peer network and learning agenda.

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Leading at Your Growing Edge: Reflecting on the 2019 Seminar on Leadership of the Faculty

by Kiernan Mathews

Jerlando Jackson leads a session during the SeminarWhat leadership is required to help faculty do their very best work for our institutions?

That was the organizing question when, earlier this month, I served as Educational Chair to a second cohort of academic leaders in the Seminar on Leadership of the Faculty. The Seminar is a COACHE program I run with the Harvard Institutes for Higher Education, with my disciplinary colleagues who are leading scholars of the professoriate, and with other outside-the-box thinkers. I started this institute because data I collect suggests that academic leaders struggle to be inventive, despite their training as faculty to be just that. One goal of the Seminar is to reconnect provosts and deans with that quality of inventiveness.

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Growing Our Own: Cultivating Faculty Leadership

by Kiernan Mathews

This article was originally published in Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning

A professor teaching

“What do the faculty think?” It's a question that governing boards and presidents ask routinely—or don't ask at their peril. It's also the question that, for nearly 15 years, has prompted nearly 300 colleges and universities to participate in the survey research project I direct to understand and assess the faculty experience.

But here's the problem: it's the wrong question. The seasoned college leader appreciates that there is no such thing as “a” faculty (“encamped just north of Armageddon,” according to Robert Zemsky) followed by a verb in the third-person singular. Rather, there are many faculties. Since Change's founding, the increasing diversity in the roles, demographics, and institutional homes of faculty is the most consequential factor bedeviling the leadership of the faculty enterprise and, therefore, any transformation of the academy.

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2018 Year in Review: COACHE Reflects on Accomplishments and Findings

A page with data points from the 2018 Faculty Job Satisfaction Survey2018 here at the Collaborative brought with it growth far surpassing our faculty surveys. We collaborated with the Harvard Institutes for Higher Education (HIHE) to launch the first ever Seminar on Leadership of the Faculty, a three-day workshop for academic leadership. An introduction between Harvard Club of New York, HIHE, and COACHE partners at the CUNY system led to a $100,000 grant for CUNY to invest in developing diverse faculty leadership. Data from the Faculty Job Satisfaction Survey yielded an exploration of mid-career faculty, an going pursuit to prevent mid-career malaise and provide support. The Faculty Retention and Exit Survey revealed the risk that a “counteroffer culture” poses to faculties’ home institutions during salary negotiations. Finally, an overhaul of our data dissemination process has made it easier for researchers to access our data in order to implement institutional changes.

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Building Policies through a Collaborative Forum at Skidmore College

The title page from the Skidmore case study documentSkidmore College, a liberal arts college in upstate New York, wanted to understand climate and leadership challenges within their academic departments. As faculty groups rarely had the opportunity to collaborate, it became increasingly difficult for faculty and administrators to address shared challenges in a unified manner and arrive at meaningful, campus-wide solutions. In an absence of a common group that could bridge this gap, Skidmore College partnered with the COACHE to conduct the Faculty Job Satisfaction Survey on their campus.

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Success After Tenure: Lessons in Engaging Mid-Career Faculty

The exterior of a university with gothic architectureThe forthcoming book, Success After Tenure: Supporting Mid-Career Faculty, offers a unique perspective on how to support mid-career faculty. The book focuses on issues faced by mid-career faculty and examines innovative programs and models that can be used to support their professional development, as well as best practices for effective faculty engagement. COACHE recently hosted a webinar, “Success After Tenure: Lessons in Engaging Mid-Career Faculty”, which discussed the trends and themes around mid-career faculty that were unearthed in the book. Lead editor of the book, Vicki L. Baker; contributing author, Todd Benson; and COACHE partners and faculty development practitioners from the Rochester Institute of Technology, Anne Marie Canale and Cheryl Herdklotz, offered their own insights and perspectives on the issue.

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APLU 2018 Annual Meeting: Top 5 Panels for Faculty- and Data-Centered Discussion

by Lauren Scungio

A university campus with red-brick buildings and a green lawnThis year's annual meeting of the Association of Public Land-Grant Universities (APLU) runs from November 11th through 13th in New Orleans, LA, and we can’t think of a more appropriate place to explore this year’s theme “Resilience: Turning Challenges into Opportunities.” Public opinions of higher education have waned to a bleak perception, leaving many parents and potential students asking, “What’s the point of college?” High student loan debts, low starting salaries, and numerous sleepless nights leave many students averse to university. The negative perception of faculty is just as threatening to the success of higher education. The oft asked question of faculty is, “What do you do if you only teach two classes?”

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Sharing Data with Faculty: The Paradox of Transparency

by Todd Benson

A pile of chartsToday, higher education institutions are using more and more data to drive decision-making. This is a good thing, however, when leaders need to include faculty in decision making and execution offering the right amount of data is of paramount importance. Faculty are, by their training, critical consumers of data and not sharing everything could be interpreted as the administration spinning the results. On the other hand, sharing every single data point can lead to an unfocused discussion. It’s no surprise then that one of the most frequent, and challenging, questions that comes up as we work with our partners is “How much of the report should we share with faculty?” Our standard answer is “Everything!” but full transparency presents its own set of challenges and concerns.

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