News

COACHE and the University of California Collaborate to Reinvent Faculty Exit Surveys

March 14, 2016


First-of-its-kind shared survey to show why faculty leave and at what costs

The University of California’s Office of the President has joined with the Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education (COACHE), a research-practice partnership based at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, to launch a faculty exit survey that is the first of its kind.

New Reports from COACHE Direct College Leaders to Understand, Support Faculty Workplace

May 21, 2014

A new series of nine white papers released to members this week by the Harvard Graduate School of Education's Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education (COACHE) offers examples from seventeen colleges and universities whose faculty indicated exceptionally high levels of satisfaction across one or more themes of the organization’s survey benchmarks. 

Study Challenges Perception of ‘Gen X’ Faculty as Career Climbers

March 4, 2010


Interviews reveal desire for “roots, not rungs.”

A new study commissioned by COACHE—the Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education at the Harvard University Graduate School of Education—challenges the common misperception of “Generation X” college faculty as self-centered careerists. Interviews with 16 faculty and administrators at three representative campuses suggest that Gen X faculty prefer, in fact, to establish long-term relationships with colleagues and others in their professional and personal communities.

The One-Two Policy Punch: Be Sure to Consider Importance *and* Effectiveness

August 1, 2007


Research pressures cause greatest angst in survey of nearly 
7,000 early-career faculty


A new report by the Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education (COACHE), a research project based at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, has revealed that junior faculty place a high degree of importance on institutional policies and practices in terms of how they affect career success. However, junior faculty expressed less satisfaction with the effectiveness of those policies and practices.

Top Academic Workplaces 2005-06

January 23, 2007

While the majority of junior faculty at America’s colleges and universities are satisfied at work, some institutions are doing extraordinarily well in this area. The survey, administered by the Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education (COACHE) in 2005, determined that some colleges and universities are “exemplary” on certain key dimensions of faculty work life.

New study indicates faculty treatment matters more than compensation

September 25, 2006


Survey of 4,500 tenure-track faculty reveals surprising findings

A new study by the Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education (COACHE), a research project based at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, has revealed that climate, culture, and collegiality are more important to the satisfaction of early career faculty than compensation, tenure clarity, workload, and policy effectiveness.